Fun creative writing exercises for college students

To read samples of student writing click here: The first page consists of a narrative description of their experiences and the second page consists of an explanation of what they learned from the experiment. Although the assignment covers two different modes of writing, it should be written as a single assignment.

Fun creative writing exercises for college students

Thinking I drive myself crazy One of the qualities of the Cento that makes this a must do warm up or writing experiment is the opportunity it provides for students to revisit writing, to look at it with new eyes, to experience how they can manipulate it, and to realize that writing begets other writing.

Students must think strategically for Centos to work. Plus, it privileges surprises through juxtaposition — a move that energizes writing.

D Definitions — partners, small groups, large groups The challenge is to collaboratively write definitions for common words. Begin by showing students a few definitions from a dictionary: Then, ask the students to suggest a few common words that would be interesting to define e.

Partner the students up or organize them in small or large groups and have them each get out a piece of paper. Have them choose a word from the list or one they have in their head and put it at the top of the paper.

Next, have them collaboratively build definitions for the chosen words in a three or four word trade off. Coach the students to use the moves that are commonly made in dictionary definitions, but surprise us with new and surprising definitions, uses, synonyms, and antonyms for the words e.

Dice — partners, small groups, large groups Throw a dice and write as many words as show on the dice for that line. A compendium of film reviews and a field guide to North American birds, or Great Expectations and a computer users guide.

Choose one of your students who is a good reader or have a parent, student teacher, or colleague be your partner. Have your students get out a piece of paper and a pencil. Then, challenge them to write down exactly what they hear as you read the two texts aloud at the same time. When the students are ready, have your partner and you read the two texts aloud simultaneously so that the words from the two texts blend in the air.

Read slowly, clearly, with emotion. As you read together, you will begin to hear when to emphasize and when not. Have fun with this. Meanwhile, your students will be channeling what they hear down on the paper. At first, they might try to only get down what they hear from one text, but that will soon fall apart, and instead, they will start to let the blur of language flow on the page.

That is what you are aiming for. Read aloud for five minutes or so. Then, have the students read what they wrote to themselves. Suggest that they can add punctuation to help with flow. Next, have them read the piece to someone else so that they can hear the real possibility in the writing.

What should happen is this otherworldly, often times quite funny, mash-up of the two texts. Like many of the experiments on this list, the more you do this, the better you get at it.

While on the surface it seems like a pretty simple experiment, the work that is happening is quite deep and sophisticated. It is not easy for students to open up and allow a cacophony of language to spill out on the page.

Here is a cool example. This particular piece was written by a 10th grader.Why We Need Creative Writing Exercises Like This. I’ve worked with hundreds of writers in the last five years, and I’ve found that the biggest killer of creativity is perfectionism.(Share that on Twitter?)“This is so bad,” we think after one particularly difficult sentence.

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Fun creative writing exercises for college students

Read educational articles, parenting articles, & more. Drawing Lab for Mixed-Media Artists: 52 Creative Exercises to Make Drawing Fun (Lab Series) [Carla Sonheim] on rutadeltambor.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Carla Sonheim is an artist and creativity workshop instructor known for her fun and innovative projects and techniques designed to help adult students recover a more spontaneous.

CONFERENCE YEAR website maintained by LOCAL WEBMASTER CONTACT PERSON and Brad Sietz. website maintained by LOCAL WEBMASTER CONTACT PERSON and Brad Sietz. This is my textbook for Creative Writing Class.

I am learning more than I dreamed possible, about the craft of the pen. This is a really powerful instructive book with lots of practices to learn. Creative writing exercises are a fun and interesting way to improve your writing skill.

Keep reading to find exercises for middle school students that will inspire poetry, plays and short stories.

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