Reflective leadership

Do you sometimes notice that you are so intensely following a discussion, while simultaneously engrossed in your internal thinking process, that you miss opportunities to share your ideas and contribute to a meeting?

Reflective leadership

Respects staff and their thoughts, opinions, and feedback Sets clear goals Trusts employees Uses humor Almost all of the qualities above refer to how effective the leader is at managing her interactions with others.

Simply put, we lead through relationships. How we lead is important: Although effectiveness as a leader is often measured in quantitative outcomes—increasing school readiness, decreasing incidences of abuse and neglect, increasing vaccination rates—it is our ability to reflect on, and optimize, our relationships that makes these goals achievable.

It is our skill in connecting with others, guiding and mentoring them, that makes good numbers a natural outgrowth of good relationships.

Reflective leadership

In other words, our accomplishments are a reflection of what our relationships have allowed us to achieve. That fundamental truth inspired this publication: Leadership takes place in the context of relationships, and quality relationships are crucial to good outcomes.

Reflective Leadership in Infant-Family Programs Leaders in the infant-family field hope that their program is one in which quality relationships characterized by trust, support, and growth exist among supervisors, staff, parents, and children.

These relationships form the foundation for all the work that is done.

Reflective leadership

Workplaces based on these beliefs and values can be thought of as relationship-based organizations. Reflective leadership is the key to creating a relationship-based organization. It is characterized by three important skills: It implies that a leader is interested in, and committed to, examining her own reactions, thoughts, and feelings about the work.

Careful observation means that leaders are skilled at deciphering the meaning of what they are seeing and hearing.

Who can edit:

Flexible responses require that leaders know their staff—what their personal styles are, how they work best, what motivates them. Flexible responses are the most basic—and sometimes most difficult—expression of mutual respect in our relationships with staff members.

Excerpted from Parlakian, R. Reflective leadership in infant-family programs.In order to assess that, and with the support sources I have read and analyzed to construct this reflective paper, I come to understand that there is a real “tool” that helps leaders (or people who aspire to become leaders) to have a realistic diagnosis/assessment of their main traits of personality and leadership attributes: self.

This piece is the sixth installment in a six-part series on leadership character by West Point’s Col. Eric Kail.. Some say experience is what .

Chapter and author info

The goals of the Reflective Leadership Institute are: Create a fair, unbiased, and inclusive police culture for the agency and community. Effectively guide the leaders of law enforcement agencies to realize the practical and moral value of cultural awareness and cultural intelligence.

The other day I was throwing around the words, “reflective leadership” when a client stopped me and asked me to explain exactly what I meant. I found myself using a familar tool in the human development field, the Johari Window, created by Joe Luft and Harry Ingham in The model is a way to look at interpersonal relationships and processes.

The Reflective Leadership Grant program at Leadership Education is a competitive grant program open to any employee of a faith-based charitable organization, which includes denominations, seminaries, church-related colleges, consultancies, congregations, Christian non-profits, Christian social enterprises, as well as others.

Read in 7 minutes Self-Reflection. The practice of self-awareness and self-reflection for those in leadership roles goes back thousands of years to the ancient philosophers and teachers.

Yet, it seems that self-reflection is the manager’s least favourite pastime.

The other day I was throwing around the words, “reflective leadership” when a client stopped me and asked me to explain exactly what I meant. I found myself using a familar tool in the human development field, the Johari Window, created by Joe Luft and Harry Ingham in The model is a way to look at interpersonal relationships and processes. The goals of the Reflective Leadership Institute are: Create a fair, unbiased, and inclusive police culture for the agency and community. Effectively guide the leaders of law enforcement agencies to realize the practical and moral value of cultural awareness and cultural intelligence. consider undertaking their own version of Critically Reflective Leadership in their school or work places. A Critical Method Critical Reflective Practice (CRP) is a research method whose definition is embodied in the three words that make up the name: critical or critically, relating to critical education.
Reflective Leadership by Katherine Ritchie on Prezi